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The Subliminal Patterns Behind Perception

  The impact of our perceptual patterns on the way we navigate the “self” has always been a cornerstone in understanding human behavior. Long before neuroscience started thought experiments on the nature reality, W. James put forward “our view of the world is truly shaped by what we decide to perceive” and that, in effect, shapes the world around us.  C. Jung, firmly believing  “unconscious is our great guide”, he proclaimed that the information stored in the unconscious plays up in decoding the world, and the manifestation of the self out there. It happens in daily life that we know

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Helen Keller on Knowledge and Optimism

  “The world is sown with good; but unless I turn my glad thoughts into practical living and till my own field, I cannot reap a kernel of the good. The desire and will to work is optimism itself.”   Helen Keller (June 27, 1880–June 1, 1968), the outstanding woman who grew up without sight or hearing, in her quest for knowing she not only became learned in philosophy, history, math, science and world matters, but also became an intellectual activist, a “doer” for the good of humankind, and the society at large. She recounts the transforming experience from her

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How One Gains Resilience

  “Resilience across writing is a good way to get out of the fog and light up your life” says Boris Cyrulnik, neuropsychiatrist and writer, having lost both his parents at the age of five, is a living model of how one develops resilience and can overcome the major dramas of life. When the word “resilience” was first used in physics it referred to a body’s ability to absorb an impact. Transformed to the human psyche, it is the capacity to transcend from traumatic experiences.  Brené Brown defines resilience as a character quality “it is how we fold our experiences

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Scientist’s Passion for Music and the Creative Flow of Improvisation

“You can think of an experiment like a song — made up of many moving parts, but structured; sometimes very repetitive. Each little piece has to come together to make a bigger picture, or answer a question about the universe.” Charles Limb, a surgeon, neuroscientist, hearing specialist and musician sets forth, “music is the most complicated sound the brain can process”. He proclaims that the human brain is capable to process such a refined and complicated task due to its innovative capacity. “The idea that one can improvise a jazz solo today is a direct reflection of the fact that

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The Fox and The Grapes

A most wonderful example of cognitive dissonance theory of psychology, written in such a delightful fable by La Fontaine. Rosy and ripe, and ready to box, The grapes hang high o’er the hungry Fox He pricks up his ears, and his eye he cocks. Ripe and rosy, yet so high! He gazes at them with a greedy eye, And he knows he must eat and drink or die. When the jump proves to be beyond his power “Pooh!” says the Fox. “Let the pigs devour Fruit of that sort. Those grapes are sour!”   Translated by: William Trowbridge Larned  

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Sustaining Happiness in Life

Happiness is defined for ages since the beginning of time. It is a lifelong quest for us human beings. For some it is an activity, for another it is acceptance, for George Sand it is to love and be loved, for Marcus Aurelius it depends on the quality of your thoughts which should be sound and aligned with virtue…and for some people happiness is sustained simply by helping the other…The list of definitions is much longer than what is written here. To bring it down to the practical habitual life, many psychological studies were done on people who could sustain

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The Oceanic Feeling

The French Nobel laureate writer Rolland, having read Freud as early as 1909, long before Europe recognized his seminal work on the human psyche, regarded Freud as a fellow pilgrim on this black continent, courageous and genius navigator, and recognized the huge power of Freud’s findings at the turn of the century in 1909. When he later visited Freud and his daughter Anna Freud in their apartment in Vienna in 1924, they would exchange their views on the 19th century including the topics such as the power of man’s instincts, morality, fear, peace of mind, and hypocrisy. Rolland would describe

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The Creative Imagination of Harold and the Purple Crayon

The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious, the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science.       —Einstein Years ago, Harold and the Purple Crayon was on the bed time reading list of my children. Every time we read this little book containing only a few handmade purple drawings, and yet we found it as fascinating as the first time. It is the story of a 4-year old boy Harold, and his creative imagination, who with his purple crayon has the power to create a world of his own simply by

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